Off the Shelf: February Magazines

Fine Cooking (Stephanie) – I enjoy looking through the pages of Fine Cooking in part because each issue offers a particular dish with recipe alternatives. The February/March issue includes meatloaf variations with aromatics, meats, mix-ins and herbs and spices ideas so you can create your own recipe. This issue also features several recipes using the banana, including Thai-Style Halibut Banana Curry with Peanuts and Banana Split Brownies.

I chose to try the Lemon-Glazed Banana Scones with Crystallized Ginger. I have to admit the flavor combination sounded strange, but nevertheless, intriguing. Also for true confession, I used powdered ginger because I wasn’t willing to send $8 on a jar of crystallized ginger for this recipe (conversion: 1/8 tsp of powdered ginger added in with the dry ingredients), so the ginger flavor is most likely less aggressive than the original recipe. Regardless, these are fantastic! I was amazed by the way the banana and lemon complemented each other.

(For any of you gluten-free readers, I successfully made these gf, but substituting my gf all-purpose flour mix of choice and adding 1 tsp of xanthan gum.)

LEMON-GLAZED BANANA SCONES WITH CRYSTALLIZED GINGER
(from Fine Cooking, Feb./Mar. 2011)
Print This Recipe

FOR THE SCONES
9 oz (2 c.) unbleached all-purpose flour; more as needed
1/4 c. granulated sugar
2 1/4 tsp baking powder
1 tsp finely grated lemon zest
3/8 tsp salt
2 3/4 oz (5 1/2 Tbsp) cold, unsalted butter, cut into pieces
1 small ripe (but not mushy) banana, cut into 1/4-inch dice (1/2 c.)
1 Tbsp minced crystallized ginger
3/4 c. + 2 Tbsp heavy cream; more for brushing
coarse white sanding sugar, optional

FOR THE GLAZE
3 oz (3/4 c.) confectioners’ sugar
1 1/2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
1/2 oz (1 Tbsp) unsalted butter, softened
pinch of salt

Position the rack in the top third of the oven and heat the oven to 375°F. Stack two rimmed baking sheets and line the top one with parchment.

In a large bowl, whisk the flour, sugar, baking powder, lemon zest, and salt. With your fingers, rub the butter into the flour mixture until a few pea-size lumps remain. Stir in the banana and the ginger. Add the cream; with a fork, gradually stir until the mixture just comes together.

Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and pat gently into a 7-inch circle about 1-inch thick. Using a knife, cut the dough into 8 wedges. Transfer to the baking sheet, spacing the wedges 1-2 inches apart. Brush the tops with heavy cream and sprinkle liberally with sanding sugar (optional).

Bake until the tops are golden, 19-25 minutes, rotating halfway through baking for even browning. Transfer the scones to a wire rack and cool slightly, 3-4 minutes.

In a small bowl, stir the confectioners’ sugar, lemon juice, butter, and salt until smooth. Drizzle the warm scones with the glaze. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Saveur (Stephanie) – I perused the 135th issue of Saveur magazine online, the Jan./Feb. issue is the chef’s edition. I have to admit that many of the recipes didn’t appeal to me as they were ingredients I don’t typically use in my kitchen. But there were several different deviled egg recipes I found interesting. I tried the Bacon-and-Cheddar Deviled Eggs; how could they not be delicious?! 🙂

BACON-AND-CHEDDAR DEVILED EGGS
(from Saveur Magazine, Jan./Feb. 2011)
Print This Recipe

MAKES 12

6 eggs
1/4 cup finely grated sharp cheddar, plus more for garnish
1/4 cup mayonnaise
2 slices bacon, cooked and chopped, plus 2 tsp. rendered bacon fat reserved
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Hot sauce, such as Sriracha, to garnish

Put eggs into a 4-qt. pot of water and bring to a boil. Remove pan from heat, cover, and let sit 15 minutes. Drain eggs and crack each shell slightly. Transfer eggs to a bowl of ice water and let cool. Peel eggs. Halve each egg; using a small spoon, transfer yolks to a medium bowl. Using a fork, mash yolks. Add cheddar, mayonnaise, 3/4 of the chopped bacon, and bacon fat; season with salt and pepper. Stir vigorously with spatula until smooth.

Transfer mixture to a plastic bag or a piping bag fitted with a smooth tip and pipe into egg whites. Garnish eggs with the remaining bacon, more cheddar, and hot sauce and serve cold or at room temperature.

Bon Appetit (Alaina) – This issue had some great looking recipes. They have a section an interesting section on honey as well as a variety of chili recipes. The Honey-Roasted Onion Tart, Roasted Beets & Citrus w/Feta, Sesame Cilantro Soup, Black Bean Chili w/Butternut Squash, and Fresh Pinapple Trifles w/Orange-Coconut Cream are just a few of the tempting recipes. However…

…Just look at the cover of this magazine. Yum. And with a boast of them being the best brownies ever and that you would want to eat the entire pan, well, I simply had to try them. Not that I needed them, mind you – it was all in the interest of kitchen research, of course. 🙂 The verdict: I DID want to eat the whole pan but I restrained myself. Despite my adding way too much flour, they turned out simply delicious. I think the combination of the browned butter, walnuts, and rich chocolatey goodness made them irresistable. [On a side note, I used dark chocolate cocoa powder.] These would be an excellent Valentine’s Dessert if you are cooking dinner for two. You could use a cookie cutter to cut them into hearts and serve them with ice cream or fresh whipped cream or all by themselves. Seriously good, folks. Make them. 

COCOA BROWNIES w/BROWNED BUTTER & WALNUTS 
(aka delicious and worth every calorie)
Bon Appetit, February 2011
Print This Recipe

10 tablespoons (1 1/4 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 1/4 cups sugar
3/4 cup natural unsweetened cocoa powder (spooned into cup to measure, then leveled)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 large eggs, chilled
1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon unbleached all purpose flour
1 cup walnut pieces

Position rack in bottom third of oven; preheat to 325°F. Line 8x8x2-inch metal baking pan with foil, pressing foil firmly against pan sides and leaving 2-inch overhang. Coat foil with nonstick spray. Melt butter in medium saucepan over medium heat. Continue cooking until butter stops foaming and browned bits form at bottom of pan, stirring often, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat; immediately add sugar, cocoa, 2 teaspoons water, vanilla, and 1/4 teaspoon (generous) salt. Stir to blend. Let cool 5 minutes (mixture will still be hot). Add eggs to hot mixture 1 at a time, beating vigorously to blend after each addition. When mixture looks thick and shiny, add flour and stir until blended. Beat vigorously 60 strokes. Stir in nuts. Transfer batter to prepared pan.

Bake brownies until toothpick inserted into center comes out almost clean (with a few moist crumbs attached), about 25 minutes. Cool in pan on rack. Using foil overhang, lift brownies from pan. Cut into 4 strips. Cut each strip crosswise into 4 brownies. DO AHEAD Can be made 2 days ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

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Magazine Review Extra: Southern Living

I’m chiming in a little late this month with my take on the holiday magazines. This year it is Southern Living that has given me the most inspiration. The magazine is filled with many beautiful pages of Christmas decorations and festive holiday houses. Then begin the recipes. I really feel like Southern Living’s forte is Christmas recipes, and it is no accident that they publish a yearly collection of Christmas recipes which I often check out of the library.

The article on party trays motivated me to create the tray pictured below for a family gathering. I served Rosemary Spiced Nuts, Cheese Straws, and olives. Everyone loved the presentation and the nuts were amazing.

My Christmas dinner is slated to include the Cherries Jubilee-Black Pepper Glazed Ham, and I really want to try the Tipsy Spiced Fruit Tart with Buttermilk Whipped Cream. Cherry-Pecan Brie is also on my list. There are entire articles on caramel dishes and peppermint hot chocolate drinks, and a myriad of side dishes, appetizers and desserts.

I had to try the Easy, Irresistible Scones and they turned out to be the best scones I have ever made. Southern Living offers four sweet and four savory variations.

All in all, it is an issue worth investing in.

I decided to change around the Southern Living recipe for spiced pecans because I wanted a certain flavor. I loved the outcome so much that I am including it here.

ROSEMARY SPICED PECANS
(greatly adapted from Southern Living December 2010)
Print this recipe

1 pound pecan halves
2 Tbsp packed dark brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
2 tsp. chopped fresh rosemary
1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
2 egg whites, beaten lightly

Toss the pecan with the egg whites. Dump in the remaining ingredients and mix to coat evenly. Bake the pecans at 350F for 15 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes, until nuts are crisp, but not burnt!

About 4 cups.

Off The Shelf: April Magazine Review

With the arrival of April we can count on the fact that spring is really here — and I’m sure we all want our cooking to reflect that. I will admit that I want the food magazines to scream SPRING — loud enough to make me want to pull them off the rack and take them home. While there are a lot of good recipes in this month’s magazines, I felt there could have been a bit more “screaming”, especially on the covers.

Everyday Food (Heather) is once again filled with a number of very appealing recipes, although I felt that some of the recipes belonged more in the category of winter or fall comfort food, rather than fresh spring eating. For instance, Carmelized Onion and Lentil Soup, Tangy Chicken with Orzo Pilaf, Beef and Tomato Stew, Spiced Tomato Soup, and Using Leftover Mashed Potatoes.

On the flip side, there are some spring-specific recipes that look terrific: Roasted Marinated Lamb with Lemon and Rosemary Potatoes, Zucchini Pasta with Ricotta, Tilapia and Quinoa with Feta and Cucumber, Garlic and Chive Dip, Chopped Greek Salad, and Emeril’s Chicken-Patty Pockets. All in all, the magazine is worth your perusal.

We tried the Bean and Cheese Burritos  for a quick and easy (and child-friendly) dinner.

BEAN AND CHEESE BURRITOS
(Everyday Food April 2010)
Print this recipe

1 cup long-grain white rice (I used brown rice which has different cooking times)
1 3/4 c. low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth
1 can (15 oz.) refried beans
4 flour tortillas (I used Trader Joe’s 100% whole wheat)
1/4 cup sour cream, plus more for serving
1 cup shredded cheese
1/2 head romaine lettuce, shredded
1/2 cup salsa, plus more for serving
avacado and cilantro, optional

Preheat oven to 350F. In a small saucepan, bring rice and broth to a boil over high. Cover, reduce heat to low, and cook 15 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let stand, covered, 5 minutes; fluff rice with a fork. (Alternatively, throw the rice and broth into your rice cooker!)

Meanwhile, in another small saucepan, warm beans and 1/4 cup water over low, stirring occasionally. Wrap tortillas in foil and place in oven to warm, about 10 minutes.

To assemble, divide beans, sour cream, rice, cheese, lettuce, and salsa among tortillas. For each tortilla, fold side closest to you over filling, then fold right and left sides toward center; tightly roll up burrito. Serve topped with more sour cream and salsa if desired.

Serves 4.

 Everyday with Rachael Ray (Heather)– I felt this magazine really could have flaunted spring just a bit more too, although they did do a good job of incorporating the season into all of their extra non-food columns. The 30-Minute Meals section does feature spring recipes such as Orecchiette with Pancetta and Peas, Denver Eggs-and-Potato Hash Sammies, and Leeky Salmon with Puff Pastry Toppers.

There is a fun section on dinner at American diners, complete with recipes for Disco Fries, White Chocolate Banana Cream Pie, Crunch-Berry Pancakes, Hobo Plate, and Curried Chicken Potpies. Other sections include Burger of the Month, Roast Chicken, How to Pull Off a Surprise Party, and Omelets for the Family.

I tried the Tortilla-Crusted Goat Cheese-and-Asparagus Quiche because I was so intrigued with using tortillas as the crust. The concept worked well, except that the tortilla was quite difficult to cut through to get a slice of the quiche onto a plate. The savings of time, not having to make a crust, might just be worth it though….

TORTILLA-CRUSTED GOAT CHEESE-AND-ASPARAGUS QUICHE
(Everyday with Rachael Ray April 2010)
Print this recipe

4 7-inch whole wheat tortillas (Trader Joe’s are terrific)
10 asparagus stalks, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
2 Tbsp. olive oil
1/2 red onion, finely chopped
4 ounces sliced mushrooms (about 1 1/2 cups)
salt and pepper
1 (4 oz.) log goat cheese (I didn’t have this so used some shredded cheese instead)
3 eggs
1/2 cup plain yogurt, preferably Greek-style (I used regular)

Preheat the oven to 375F. In a greased 9-inch pie plate, overlap the tortillas to make a crust; place on a rimmed baking sheet.

Meanwhile, fill a large nonstick skillet a third of the way with salted water; bring to a boil. Add the asparagus and cook until crisp-tender, about 1 minute; drain, rinse under cold water and pat dry (or, use leftover asparagus!).

Wipe out the skillet, add the olive oil and heat over medium-high heat. Add the onion and mushrooms, season with salt and pepper and cook until the mushrooms are golden, about 3 minutes. Stir in the asparagus; season with salt and pepper. Spread evenly in the tortilla crust, then crumble in the cheese on top.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs and yogurt and season with salt and pepper; pour into the tortilla crust. Bake on the baking sheet until just set in the center and lightly golden, about 30 minutes. Let rest for 10 minutes before serving.

Serves 4.

Bon Appetit — (Alaina) Bon Appetit has once again provided a wonderful assorment of recipes that feature spring produce including Korean Rice Bowl with Steak, Asparagus, and Fried Egg, Quick chicken Paella with Sugar Snap Peas, and Fresh Pea and Mint Soup. There is also a wonderful section on cakes. The pictures are stunning and inspiring. I think this magazine remains one of my favorites.

I chose to try the Moroccan Carrot Soup. It was amazing! Hands down the best carrot soup I’ve ever had. The flavors combined in a tantalizing and delicious bowl of creamy goodness.


MOROCCAN CARROT SOUP
(Bon Appetit, April 2010)
Print this recipe

2 Tb. (1/4 stick) butter
1 c. chopped white onion
1 lb. large carrots, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch dice (about 22/3 cups)
2 1/2 c. low-salt chicken broth
1 1/2 tsp. cumin seeds (I used 1 1/2 tsp. ground cumin)
1 Tb. honey
1 tsp. fresh lemon juice
1/8 tsp. ground allspice
1/2 c. plain yogurt, stirred to loosen

Melt butter in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onion; sauté 2 minutes. Mix in carrots. Add broth; bring to boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer until carrots are very tender, about 20 minutes.

Stir cumin seeds in small skillet over medium-high heat until fragrant, 4 to 5 minutes; cool. Finely grind in spice mill.

Remove soup from heat. Puree in batches in blender until smooth. Return to same pan. Whisk in honey, lemon juice, and allspice. Season with salt and pepper.

Ladle soup into bowls. Drizzle yogurt over; sprinkle generously with cumin.

Saveur — (Alaina) Recently, I qualified for a one-year subscription to Saveur magazine. It came just in time to include in this month’s magazine review. This is a delightful magazine. At first glance, it seemed like it didn’t have very many recipes but the more I read, the more recipes I realized there were. It also has beautiful photos, great articles and information, and wonderful recipes. I’m looking forward to more issues!

I enjoyed the way this magazine is layed out. It included an article and photos on Rome, Italy and then gave a lot of recipes to go with it – Cacio E Pepe, Gnocchi Alla Romana, Fagioli Tonno, and many more. It also had a section Taipei (Taiwanese Cooking) with very traditional and authentic recipes. I think that’s what I liked the most – it seems like they remained true to the cultures they featured.

Cardamom was featured in the April issue and so I decided to try the Cardamom-Ginger Crunch. It’s a shortbread with a candy-like layer on top. Cardamom is a distinct flavor with a citrusy taste. In my opinion, it’s an aquired flavor. I like it, I don’t love it. My dad and my youngest son loved it and the rest of us liked it with the exception of my oldest two. I halved this recipe.


CARDAMOM-GINGER CRUNCH
(Saveur, April 2010)
Print this recipe

2 cups unsalted butter, softened, plus more for greasing
1 cup sugar
3 cups flour, sifted
11 tsp. ground ginger
3 1⁄2 tsp. ground cardamom
2 tsp. baking powder
2 tsp. kosher salt
1 1⁄2 cups confectioners’ sugar
3 tbsp. golden syrup or dark corn syrup

1. Heat oven to 375°. Grease a 9″ x 13″ baking dish; set aside. Put 18 tbsp. butter and sugar in a large bowl; beat with a handheld mixer on medium until fluffy. Add flour, 3 tsp. ginger, 1 tsp. ground cardamom, baking powder, and 1 tsp. salt; mix until incorporated but still crumbly. Transfer mixture to reserved dish; press flat with your hands. Bake until shortbread is golden brown, about 20 minutes. Let cool.

2. In a 1-qt. saucepan over medium heat, combine remaining butter, ginger, cardamom, and salt and the confectioners’ sugar and syrup. Bring to a boil and pour over shortbread; cool. Cut into 2″ rectangles.

MAKES 48 PIECES

Off The Shelf: March Magazines

(Heather) – Now that we are well into 2010, the food magazines have begun to arrive en masse. First up this month is Food Network. The March issue encompasses 140 pages. Along with all the normal features (such as Food News, Star Kitchen, Fun Cooking, He Made-She Made, and Copy That), there are a number of great feature articles which include: cooking with orange juice concentrate, 11,375 stir-fry possibilities complete with some amazing photos, easy green snacks for St. Patrick’s Day, Weeknight Cooking and Weekend Cooking — all of which have very appealing recipes, a Ravioli how-to, and a pull-out booklet on 50 Pizzas. The magazine ends with a lengthy spread devoted to the upcoming Oscars, including Hollywood-specific recipes.

I chose a recipe from the On The Road feature — Green Apple-SourDough Pancakes. I love the smell and taste of sourdough and these pancakes were lovely. And my kids ate them right up too!

GREEN APPLE-SOURDOUGH PANCAKES
(Food Network Magazine March 2010)
Print this recipe

For the sourdough starter:
1 cup whole milk
1 tsp. active dry yeast (1/2 packet)
1/2 cup apple cider (I had to substitute apple juice with 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar)
3 Tbsp. packed light brown sugar
2 Tbsp. butter, melted
1 cup all-purpose flour

For the pancakes:
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 large egg, slightly beaten
1 tsp. baking soda
1 small tart green apple (such as Granny Smith), unpeeled and diced
1-2 Tbsp. butter
maple syrup or honey, for serving
chopped pecans, for garnish (optional)

Make the sourdough starter: Warm the milk in a small saucepan over low heat to about 110F. Transfer to a medium bowl, sprinkle with the yeast and let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. Whisk in the cider, brown sugar, butter and 1 cup flour until smooth. Cover with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature overnight.

The next morning, make the pancakes: whisk 1/2 cup flour, the egg, baking soda and apple into the sourdough starter. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a cast-iron griddle or non-stick skillet over medium heat and swirl to coat. Pour about 1/4 cup batter onto the griddle for each pancake. (Alternatively, cook on an electric pancake griddle.) Cook until the tops are bubbly and the edges set, about 3 minutes, then flip and cook until golden and cooked through, 1 to 2 more minutes. Repeat with the remaining batter, adding more butter as needed. Drizzle with syrup and garnish with pecans, if desired.

Makes about 12 pancakes.

(Heather) – Next up is Everyday with Rachael Ray which boasts 462 easy recipes, tips & deals. The magazine opens with a number of regular features and this month includes a section on beating the winter blahs. There are focus pages on cauliflower, coffee, slow cookers, supermarket traps. My favorite section of this magazine is the five-page Meet the Grains feature, introducing us to brown rice, millet, barley, farro, buckwheat, and quinoa. I hope to obtain most, if not all, of these grains and begin to incorporate them into our diet. (Perhaps you’ll read about the results on this blog!)

As always the magazine includes some great suggestions for 30-minute meals, as well as a section on classic dishes (think chicken noodle soup, chocolate cake, apple pie, lasagna). Recipes for Oscar night fill several pages and, wouldn’t you know, there’s a lengthy article on the nation’s best pizza and how to make it (do magazine editors consult each other?).

I will mention that my biggest pick with this issue was from their Supermarket Traps article. The article actually encourages you to “save produce shopping for last; this will prevent overbuying.” Their argument being that produce has the highest profit margin and supermarket owners want you to buy a lot. In my opinion, fresh produce is what you should be filling the bulk of your cart with. The more fresh food we eat the more likely we are to have good health.

The Spaghetti Squash with Sausage and Greens from the $10 Dinners caught my attention. The recipe worked well and tasted great and one could even substitute regular pasta for the spaghetti squash.

SPAGHETTI SQUASH WITH SAUSAGE AND GREENS
(Everyday with Rachael Ray March 2010)
Print this recipe

1 spaghetti squash (about 3 1/2 pounds), halved lengthwise
1/3 cup grated parmesan cheese
salt and pepper
1 1/2 tsp. olive oil
12 oz. sweet Italian sausage
1 bunch spinach, stems discarded and leaves coarsely chopped (I used a 10 oz. bag of fresh spinach)
1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper

The magazine has you cook the spaghetti squash in the microwave. Because I try to avoid microwave cooking I placed my halved squash in a baking pan, added about 1-inch of water and baked it at 350F for 45-60 minutes until tender.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook until no longer pink, about 6 minutes. Add the spinach and crushed red pepper and cook until wilted, about 2 minutes; season with salt and pepper.

Using a fork, comb the cooked squash into strands into a bowl. Toss with the parmesan and season with black pepper. Serve the spinach and sausage over the squash.

Serves 4.

(Alaina) – Everyday Food is focused on spring! It has some wonderful looking salad recipes, a whole section on poaching eggs and recipes for them, five different uses for homemade pizza dough (which all look amazing!), as well as their usual meal plan with grocery a list. I continue to be impressed with this magazine. They make gourmet food easy! The Beer-Braised Sausages with Warm Potato Salad, Almond Torte with Pears and Whipped Cream, and the Swiss Chard Pie are just a few of the recipes I would love to try!

I decided to try the Orecchiette with Bacon and Tomato Sauce – Orcchiette is a small shell-like pasta which I didn’t happen to have on hand so mine was actually Orzo with Bacon and Tomato Sauce. Orzo is a small pasta that looks a little like rice. It worked well. This was a little spicy for my kids, so I would reduce the red-pepper flakes to 1/4 tsp. The smoky bacon is so good in this simple dish!

ORECCHIETTE WITH BACON & TOMATO SAUCE
(Everyday Food, March 2010)
Print this recipe

1 Tb. extra-virgin olive oil
4 slices bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 medium red onion, halved and thinly sliced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 tsp. red-pepper flakes
1 can (28 oz.) whole peeled tomatoes
Coarse salt and ground pepper
1 lb. orecchiette or other short pasta
Grated Parmesan and chopped fresh parsley, for serving

In a medium saucepan, heat oil over medium-high. Add bacon and cook until browned and almost crisp, about 4 min. Add onion and cook until softened, 3 to 5 min. Add garlic and red-pepper flakes and stir until fragrant, 1 min. Add tomatoes, breaking them up as you go, and season with salt and pepper. Bring sauce to a boil; reduce to a simmer and cook until slightly reduced, 15 min.

Meanwhile, in a large pot of salted water, cook pasta 1 minute less than package instructions. Reserve cup pasta water; drain pasta and return to pot.

Add sauce and pasta water to pasta and toss to combine; cook over medium-high until sauce thickens and coats pasta, about 2 min. Serve pasta topped with Parmesan and parsley.

(Alaina) – Cooking Light has a wide variety of recipes including many different proteins and vegetarian dishes. The photos are inspiring and the articles interesting. I especially enjoyed the article on 25 Most Common Cooking Mistakes – and yes, I’m definitely guilty of some of them! The Lentil-Barley Burgers with Fiery Fruit Salad, Apricot-Ginger Bellinis, Pear & Prosciutto Pizza, and Braised Short Ribs with Egg Noodles all look amazing.

I decided to try the lightened up Sour Cream Coffee Cake which was actually one of the Cooking Light staff favorites! And I agree – it was surprisingly delicious! I used yogurt which is the perfect substitute for sour cream if you don’t have any and since mine was fat-free plain, it reduced the fat in this recipe even more!

SOUR CREAM COFFEE CAKE
(Cooking Light, March 2010)
Print this recipe

3/4 c. old-fashioned oats, divided
1 c. flour
1/4 c. whole wheat flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 c. granulated sugar
1/2 c. packed brown sugar, divided
1/3 c. butter, softened
2 lg. eggs
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 (8-oz) carton light sour cream (I used fat free plain yogurt)
2 Tb. finely chopped walnuts (I used pecans because we love them!)
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1 Tb. chilled butter, cut into small pieces

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.

Spread oats in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake at 350 for 6 minutes or until oats are barely fragrant and light brown. Coat a 9-inch springform pan (I used a regular 9-in. round glass baking pan) with cooking spray; set aside. Reserve 1/4 c. oats; set aside. Place remaining oats in a food processor; process 4 seconds or until finely ground. Combine flours, processed oats, baking powder, baking soda, and salt; stir with whisk.

Place a granulated sugar, 1/4 c. brown sugar, and 1/3 c. butter in a lg. bowl. Beat with a mixter at medium speed for 3 min. or until light and fluffy. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla. Add flour mixture to sugar mixture alternately with sour cream, beginning and ending with flour mixture. (Batter will be slightly lumpy because of oats.) Spoon batter into prepared pan; spread evenly.

Combine remaining 1/4 c. oats and 1/4 c. brown sugar, nuts, and cinnamon in a bowl. Cut in 1 Tb. butter with a pastry blender until well blended. Sprinkle top of batter evenly with nut mixture. Bake at 350 degrees for 38 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, top is golden, and cake begins to pull away from sides of pan.

Cool cake in pan for 10 min. Serves 10.

Off The Shelf: December Food Magazines

December has come and with that all of the new food magazines. Ours arrived remarkably late this year and we have yet to see a few of them. But here our reviews of three magazines.

Everyday Food (Heather) — I was kind of hoping that December’s issue of Everyday Food would be just a little bit more festive. Granted, it does have 20 pages devoted just to holiday food, but somehow I wanted a whole issue with almost nothing but holiday food.

You will find a number of good dinner recipes for “everyday” cooking as well as a whole section on soups. Holiday recipes include: Brandied Ham, Spinach and Gruyere Souffle, Crispy Potato Roast, Leek Gratin, Fudge, Truffles and Mini Fruitcakes.

I chose to try the Crostini with Kale and Parmesan, since the thought of using Kale as an appetizer had never occurred to me before. Despite enjoying Kale as a side-dish, I was slightly apprehensive about this recipe. However, one bite was all it took to impress me! This recipe is GOOD! The tangy greens on top of the crisp, salty bread, with just a bit of bite from the parmesan yields a really delightful appetizer that’s also not that bad for your health!


CROSTINI WITH KALE AND PARMESAN
(Everyday Food Magazine, December 2009)

1 baguette, sliced 1/3-inch thick on the diagonal
3+ Tbsp. olive oil
salt & pepper
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 pounds kale, washed, stems removed, leaves sliced into 1/4-inch strips
2 tsp. lemon juice (I substituted 2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar)
1 small wedge Parmesan

Preheat the oven to 400F. Arrange bread slices on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt & pepper. Bake until light golden brown, 8 to 10 minutes. (I needed mine to finish in a hurry, so I eventually turned on the broiler).

In a large skillet, heat 2 Tbsp. olive oil and garlic over medium-high heat until garlic is fragrant. Add kale and cook until wilted, about 5 minutes. Season with salt & pepper and add 1 cup water; cover and reduce heat to medium. Cook until almost all liquid has evaporated, 12 minutes. Uncover and cook until liquid is evaporated, 3 to 5 minutes. Toss with lemon juice or balsamic vinegar.

Top crostini with kale. With a vegetable peeler, shave Parmesan on top.

Serves 8.

Everyday with Rachael Ray (Alaina) — While this issue is a double issue and claims to have many ideas, I found it rather disappointing. Appetizers, drinks,  snacks, desserts, and cookies are the main types of recipes I look for in December/Holiday issues of magazines. This issue has a few of these things but nothing that really makes me want to get in the kitchen and cook or bake. The magazine does feature a few pages of holiday menu.

Lest I sound too harsh, there were some great sounding recipes. Some of the recipes that sound especially good are Nougat Hot Chocolate w/Whipped Cream, Caramelized Banana Loaf Cake, French Onion Mac ‘n’ Cheese, and Smoked Mozzarella and Chicken Sandwiches with Italian Barbecue Sauce.

I did make the Chived Yorkshire Puddings and they were delicious. The whole family enjoyed them and I would make them again. Mine  rose beautifully and then deflated a bit – perhaps if I had left them in a couple more minutes they would have faired a little better. They were very tasty nonetheless! The oniony flavor of the chives was a great addition.

CHIVED YORKSHIRE PUDDINGS
(Everyday with Rachael Ray, Dec./Jan. 2009-2010)

3 large eggs
1 1/2 cups milk
1 cup flour
Salt and pepper
2 tablespoons finely chopped chives
1/4 cup vegetable oil

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. In a medium bowl, beat together the eggs and milk; stir in the flour, 1/2 tsp. salt and 1 pinch of pepper. Gently stir in the chives; then let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Brush two jumbo muffin pans with oil or use 12 8-oz. ramekins set on a baking sheet. Transfer to the oven and let stand until hot, about 5 minutes.

Transfer the muffin pans to a heatproof work surface. Working quickly, add 1/4 c. batter to each cup, then bake until puffed and golden-brown, 15-17 minutes. Run a knife around each cup to loosen and serve immediately.

Makes 12

Cooking Light (Alaina) — This is truly a double issue. It has a lot of recipes and is 292 pages! This issue was less disappointing. It has 13 cookie recipes, 20 dessert recipes, and 7 beverage recipes. For a magazine that generally seems to focus on savory dishes, I am impressed. The recipes look delicious – Pecan-Date Bars, Raspberry-Cream Cheese Brownies, Lemon-Almond Tarts, Roasted Pear Creme Brulee, and many more! They had even have a recipe for Toasted Coconut Marshmallows. I’ve mentioned this feature before but I like that they list serving information – serving size, calories, fat etc.

I made the Hot Buttered Vanilla Rum. I’ll be honest, it was way to strong for us. However, if you really, really enjoy rum, this drink is for you. I was hoping for more of a buttery flavor and stronger vanilla (next time, I would cut the vanilla bean completely in half and scrape the seeds into the mixture at the beginning).


HOT BUTTERED VANILLA RUM
(Cooking Light, December 2009)

1 1/2  cups  water
2  tablespoons  sugar
1  vanilla bean
1  (2-inch) piece lemon rind
1  cup  dark rum
1  tablespoon  butter

Bring first 4 ingredients to a boil in a small saucepan. Remove from heat; cover and let stand 15 minutes. Strain mixture through a fine sieve over a bowl, reserving liquid; discard solids. Return water mixture to pan. Add rum and butter to pan; bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring until butter melts. Serve immediately.

I (Alaina) haven’t had a chance to check out Bon Appetit yet. And while I’m not generally a fan of Taste of Home, I’m usually impressed with the holiday issue though I haven’t seen this year’s magazine. They seem to know how to do holidays right! So you might check out those two publications!

Off the Shelf: November Magazines

Are you thinking about purchasing a food magazine for Thanksgiving inspiration? Do you look at all the selections and wonder which one will be best for you? Today, I’m reviewing four different magazines. Each was inspiring in different ways with the full-color photos, mouth-watering recipes, and great ideas!

IMG_8511FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE (November 2009)

Food Network Magazine boasts 138 recipes – some holiday and some general, yummy, mostly easy-looking recipes for every day.

They feature at least 4 turkey recipes using various cuts and methods as well as six stuffing recipes including a Pear-Pecan Stuffing that sounds amazing and I plan to make next week! There are several side dish recipes to change up your normal offerings but perhaps the very best feature of this publication is the pull-out in the middle – 50 mashed potato recipes. The many takes on white and sweet potatoes are sure to inspire you to try something new!

A few other holiday recipes that caught my eye are the Pumpkin Banana Mousse Tart, Ellie Krieger’s Creamed Spinach, and the snack recipes using Thanksgiving leftovers. One last thing that I really like about the Food Network Magazine is the picture recipe index which is divided by category –  you can see photos of every recipes offered with the exception of the pull-out. It’s a lovely and delicious way to inspire your creativity.

IMG_8508 FOOD & WINE (November 2009)

Food & Wine is, of course (!), a star when it comes to wine pairings with your Thanksgiving feast but it doesn’t end there. They have some wonderful looking recipes including a full Thanksgiving menu with photos and recipes. A few other recipes that especially sounded delcious were a Bacon, Onion, & Rye Stuffing, 5-Spice Glazed Sweet Potatoes w/Walnut Toffee, Carrot Soup, and Pear Tarte Tatin w/Red Wine Caramel.

They feature a pull-out with 15 wine pairing rules – it includes a wine and a recipe to pair it with in addition to the rules. Very nice! I also thoroughly enjoy their chef interviews and beautiful photos.

I made the Maple-Ginger-Roasted Vegetables w/Pecans and while I don’t prefer turnips and brussel sprouts (I know, I’m sorry!), this recipe also had cauliflower, butternut squash, and carrots and would make a terrific and different side dish for the holidays! And you could easily substitute other vegetables. Let me tell you – the pecans were an amazing and slightly unexpected addition to this recipe!

IMG_8445

You can find the recipe in the November 2009 issue or on Food & Wine’s website.

IMG_8507COOKING LIGHT (November 2009)

Once again, Cooking Light has outdone itself. It has wonderful holiday recipes and boasts a picture for every recipe – inspiring for any cook! It also divides the recipes by category.

If you are wanting to do a protein other than turkey, then this is definitely the magazine for you. While they have the traditional turkey recipe, they also feature lamb, beef, salmon, and more which I think is really nice.

I like that they feature several lighter dessert recipes that all look amazing and delicious! I would be proud to present any of them at my holiday table.

Some of the recipes that I especially would enjoy making are Herbed Beef Tenderloin w/2 Onion Jus, Fontina Stuffed Potato Skins, Cranberry Upside-Down Cake, and Winter Sangria.

I did make the delicious Sweet Potato & Butternut Gratin. It would be an excellent side dish for a holiday meal! I did substitute swiss cheese for the Gruyere and as a suggested substitute used a smoked bacon instead of the pancetta. All in all, very good and very pretty!

IMG_8456

You can find the recipe in the November 2009 magazine or on Cooking Light’s website.

IMG_8515BON APPETIT (Novebemer 2009)

This is the first time I have really looked at an issue of Bon Appetit and I am hooked. Their Thanksgiving recipe section is beautiful, easy to use, and completely inspiring – the photos are awesome! It is divided into sections:  Turkey & Gravy, Stuffing, Relishes, Potatoes, Sides,  Breads, & Desserts. It features many recipes in each section.

They offer 10 themed feast menues including Farm-To-Table, Do Ahead, Fresh & Light, Quick & Easy, Beginners, and five others! I also like the recipe key: M=Make Ahead, S=Show-Off, Q=Quick & Easy, and T=Take Along. It makes the magazine very user friendly.

Some of the recipes that I really want to try are Cranberry Vanilla Bean Sorbet, Butternut Squash & Cheddar Bread Pudding, Herb & Cheese Popovers, and Green Beans w/Walnuts & Lemon Vinagrette. Yum!

If I were to reccomend only one magazine purchase for Thanksgiving, Bon Appetit would be it! The others are all great and feature fabulous recipes and would certainly be worth your while but this is the one I enjoyed and look forward to using the most for the holidays!